Kingdom of Anak Sungai / Sumatera, prov. Bengkulu

Kingdom of Anak Sungai is located in the northern part of province of Bengkulu; now its territory consists of the valleys of the Menjunto River in the north to the Water of Urai in the South.

Location province of Bengkulu


* Foto sultans and kings today on Sumatera: link
* Foto sultans and kings on Sumatera in the past: link

* Foto kingdoms in Simalungun area: link
* Foto small kingdoms in Aceh in the past: link

* Foto Minangkabau People: link
* Foto Batak People: link
* Foto old sites on Sumatera: link


History of the kingdom of Anak Sungai

Google translation

At the beginning of the 17th century the kingdom of Anak Sungai was a province of the Indrapura Kingdom under Sultan Muzaffar Shah (1620-1660). Its people consist of indigenous villagers known as Tribe Anak Sungai, coastal people, who settled there open rice fields while pepper gardening, which is a small number of Palembang and Jambi. The majority are the people of the Padang Darat, who mostly live in the market as traders.

In 1663 the Kingdom of Indrapura made trade agreements with the VOC. In the mid-seventeenth century, the Kingdom of Anak Sungai was still under the Indrapura Kingdom, whose deputy was based in Manjuto with the title of King Adil, Tuanku Sungut, the nephew of Sultan Muhammad Shah’s sister.

During the 17th century the people of the Kingdom of Anak Sungai wanted to separate itself from the power of the Sultan of Indrapura. This desire was supported by King Adil. Then came the political unrest in the kingdom of Anak Sungai; a separating movement from the power of Indrapura led by relatives Sultan Muhammad Shah who represented him in the territory of the Son of the River. 


History of the kingdoms in the Bengkulu area

The region of Bengkulu was subject to the Buddhist Srivijaya empire in the 8th century. The Shailendra Kingdom and Singosari Kingdom succeeded the Srivijaya kingdom, but it is unclear whether they spread their influence over Bengkulu. The Majapahit also had little influence over Bengkulu. There were only few smalls ‘kedatuan’ based on ethnicity such as in

In the region of Bengkulu once were ethnic-based kingdoms such as: kingdom of Sungai Serut,
kingdom of Selebar,
kingdom of Pat Petulai,
kingdom of Balai Buntar,
kingdom of Sungai Lemau,
kingdom of Sekiris,
kingdom of Gedung Agung,
kingdom of Marau Riang.

They were under the sultanate of Banten, as vazals.
Some areas of Bengkulu, also were under the authority of the Kingdom of Inderapura since the 17th century.
Some areas of Bengkulu, also were under the authority of the Kingdom of Inderapura since the 17th century.

The first European visitors to the area were the Portuguese, followed by the Dutch in 1596. The English East India Company established a pepper-trading center and garrison at Bengkulu (Bencoolen) in 1685. In 1714 the British built Fort Marlborough, which still stands.

In 1785, the area was integrated into British Empire as Bencoolen, while the rest of Sumatra and most of the Indonesian archipelago was part of the Dutch East Indies. Despite the difficulties of keeping control of the area while Dutch colonial power dominated the rest of Sumatra, the British persisted, maintaining their presence for roughly 140 years before ceding Bengkulu to the Dutch as part of the Anglo-Dutch Treaty of 1824 in exchange for Malacca. Bengkulu then remained part of the Dutch East Indies.


Old maps of Sumatera

For old maps of Sumatera (1565, 1588, 1598, 1601, 1616, 1620, 1707, 1725, 1760), klik here

Sumatera, 1707


Source (only indon. language)

– Sejarah kerajaan Anak Sungai: http://blogkasihpunya.blogspot.nl/2017/01/kerajaan-anak-sungai-bengkulu.html
– Sejarah Bengkulu: http://juragansejarah.blogspot.nl/2011/12/sejarah-kota-bengkulu.html


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