Kingdom of Sukawati / Bali

The kingdom of Sukawati is located on the island of Bali, District of Gianyar.

Location of Sukawati
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Location of Bali


* Foto kings on Bali today: link
* Foto kings of Bali in the past: link
* Foto Bali in the past: link
* Foto old sites on Bali: link
* Foto puputan Denpasar, 1906: link
* Foto puputan Klungkung, 1908: link


History of the kingdom

In 1711 AD, the kingdom of Sukawati was founded, located in Batuan, under the leadership of I Dewa Agung Anom.
I Dewa Agung Anom as the founder of the Sukawati Kingdom is according to babad dalem mentioned as the son of the king of Klungkung Ida I Dewa Agung Jambe.. Since his reign, the people of Timbul village have been enthusiastic, therefore Timbul village has changed into Sukahati (now Sukawati).

The Royal Palace Sukawati is located in front of the Timbul market which was completed in 1710 AD, named Puri Grokgak, about 27 km to the South of Smarajayapura.
After Grokgak palace was completed, the Grand God of Anom Sirikan moved from his residence to occupy Grokgak Castle. Also was built Pemarajan named Pura Penataran Agung now.

In the days of the Dalem Sukawati Kingdom, Banjar Pacung was a forest called Alas Temu. This is where the first Sukawati King, Anak Agung Anom died.
Anak Agung Gede Dharma Putra, a descendant of Dalem Sukawati, told that Anak Agung Anom was the ancestor of the King of Ubud and Peliatan. In addition, he is also the forerunner of the Puri Agung Gianyar.

During its heyday Anak Agung Anom or known as Dalem Sukawati had a loyal servant named Dewa Manggis. As a reward for his kindness, when he was about to die, Dalem Sukawati gave Dewa Manggis the teachings of Nithi Sastra (government science).

After Dalem Sukawati died and Dewa Manggis understood the knowledge given, he founded the Gianyar Kingdom. Therefore, until now, Puri Agung Gianyar and Puri Agung Sukawati have a good relationship.

Puri Ageng Sukawati


List of kings

Versi 1

* 1710-1745: Sri Aji Maha Sirikan, king Sukawati I
* 1745-1770: Dewa Agung Gede Mayun, king Sukawati II
* 1770-1790: Dewa Agung Gede, king Sukawati III.
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Versi 2

* 1713-1733: Dewa Agung Anom (king of Sukawati)
* 1733-sebelum 1757: Dewa Agung Gede Mayun Dalem Patemo [child of Dewa Agung Anom]
* 1757: Dewa Agung Gede Sukawati [child of Dewa Agung Gede Mayun]
* second half of century 18: Dewa Agung Made Pliatan [brother Dewa Agung Gede Sukawati].


Puri (palaces) on Bali

Puri on the island of Bali is the name for the residence of Balinese aristocrats, especially those who are still close relatives of Balinese kings. Based on the system of division of triwangsa or caste, the castle is occupied by aristocrats who are knights.

Puri on Bali are ruled by a descendant of the king, who is generally elected by the puri kinship institution. The leader of the puri, who is generally the leader of the puri kinship institution, is usually referred to as the Penglingsir or Pemucuk. The royal descendants can be identified by the titles in their names, for example Ida I Dewa Agung, I Gusti Ngurah Agung, Cokorda, Anak Agung Ngurah, Ratu Agung, Ratu Bagus and others for men; as well as Ida I Dewa Agung Wife, Dewa Ayu, Cokorda Wife, Anak Agung Wife, and others for women.

Entrance-gate of the Puri Saren Agung in Ubud

puri saren ubud


Pura (temples) on Bali

A pura is a Balinese Hindu temple and the place of worship for adherents of Balinese Hinduism in Indonesia. Pura’s are built in accordance with rules, style, guidance and rituals found in Balinese architecture. Most pura’s are found on the island of Bali, where Hinduism is the predominant religion; however many puras exist in other parts of Indonesia where significant numbers of Balinese people reside. Mother Temple of Besakih is the most important, largest and holiest temple in Bali.
– For more information: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balinese_temple

Besakih Temple is a temple complex in the village of Besakih on the slopes of Mount Agung in eastern Bali. It is the most important, the largest and holiest temple of Hindu religion in Bali, and one of a series of Balinese temples.


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